How do you summarise Science Online 2010 in 140 characters?

Inquisitive, hungry, intense, can get nasty? Science nerd or squirrel?

Science Online 2010 wrapped up on Sunday and, despite its brilliant format, great networking opportunities and overall general coolness of fun and quirky participants, I was left with a dilemma.

If anyone can possibly tell me how to wrap up a conference about science, the web, technology and journalism to fit into a Twitter post, I will either fund your child’s college education (or at least buy them a cell biology textbook) or do the Locomotion at the next Sci Online 2011 (as an Australian, sorry about Kylie Minogue).

Because for anyone new to Twitter or just not good at headline-style conversation, even isolating topics into a catchy tweet was difficult. If you don’t believe me, check out the archive here and see what really catches your eye.

My point being that, for those who have mastered the art of the tweet, it really does equate to microjournalism and full-length blogging should as such be given the same cred as ‘dead-tree’ media (thanks to an unknown conference delegate for pulling out that term. Should we call web writers ‘ozone-depleting’ or ‘powergrid-draining’ media?).

It will take a while to get my summary of the conference to a respectable length, so for now I’ll refer to others who have already slept off their jetlag, showed their respect to the great dreamer on Martin Luther King Day and got their thoughts into an ordered state not overly addled by caffeine or sweet tea (an abominable North Carolina drink, sorry for saying so).

Co-organiser Bora gathered a full list together at http://scienceblogs.com/clock/2010/01/blogmedia_coverage_of_scienceo.php, which includes some of my favourites so far:

http://galleyproofs.blogspot.com/2010/01/things-i-learned-at-scienceonline2010.html

http://scienceinthetriangle.org/2010/01/rebooting-science-journalists/

http://www.walterjessen.com/scienceonline2010-follow-up-medical-journalism/

http://www.sciencecheerleader.com/

http://johnmckay.blogspot.com/

In another recent news, here’s a link to a new f1000 Report discussing osteoarthritis treatments:

f1000 Report by Yves Henrotin

Tags: , , .

Filed under Communication, Conferences, F1000, Journalism, Literature, Science.

6 comments

  1. becca says:

    #scio10 sum: bloggers&MORE;jenny-measles;@BORAZ!;facts?;science everywhere;tell stories;who to trust?;books=win!;twitterblister;duck sex FUN

    • stevepog says:

      wow what an exciting search string you have running there. it’s like you’ve scoured the scio10 twitter stream and picked key words. amazing what spambots can do these days. To Becca, I’m guessing a spammer hijacked your email?

  2. Da Wintle says:

    I would advance the counter-argument that there’s no point in trying to summarize Science Online in 140 characters. Who’s going to read it, and why?

    In the spirit of full disclosure, I should state that I hate Twitter and everything to do with it, though. ;)

    • rpg says:

      laughs Yeah. No one’s interested in science online conferences anyway. cough

      • stevepog says:

        Guess you’re hoping that’s not true, otherwise SOLO could be a fizzer. Re our favourite commenter Da Wintle (no sarcasm implied), I agree on the summary point but there were many at Sci Online who were trying to do just that: wrap up 48 hours (and an extra three at the bar) in a few tweets.

        I don’t hate Twitter, from a company POV it’s been a great way to get the message out in short bursts and at other times it’s like texting without having to worry about phone companies or even having the recipient’s phone number. I set up several appointments at Sci Online using Twitter alone