Leaky brain, nose vs behavior, and precision med’s new era

The trending article recommendations on the @F1000 feed this week, as well as other interesting picks from around Twitter.

Have a great weekend!

And elsewhere on Twitter…
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Interview with tomorrow’s #F1000talks host Kirsten Lee

Kirsten LeeF1000 Specialist Kirsten Lee is the host of our next #F1000talks tweetchat, which takes place tomorrow (Wednesday April 15), 1 PM EST/6 PM GMT on the @F1000 channel. Here we get to know a little more about her.

Kirsten is a neuroscientist, an F1000 Specialist, a beginner cyclist, and a foursquare super user. Currently, she’s a postdoctoral fellow at the City University of New York, where she’s investigating the neurotransmitter glutamate’s role in transporter-mediated synaptic clearance. Previously she established the microfluidics system for Ca2+ imaging in immobilized worm neurons at the same institution. Kirsten’s aim is to get into clinical trials management and work for a specialty pharmaceutical company.

Since she started her work as an F1000 Specialist, Kirsten has realized how much detail goes into product development. “I became more enthusiastic about utilizing social media to brand my interest in biomedical science, to share valuable career development resources, and to broaden my knowledge on new development in the biomedical science industry.” This is what inspired her to host this tweet chat.

In order to learn more about Kirsten, we’ve composed some questions, and asked her to answer them in ten words or less – not an easy feat! Let the fun begin!
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EB2015: our highlights

We had a lot of fun attending #EB2015 in Boston. We met many old friends and made firm new ones, including #EBmouse. Here are our highlights from the conference…

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Hollywood & the environment, exodus of the exosomes, and feeding time…

The trending article recommendations on the @F1000 feed this week, as well as other interesting picks from around Twitter.

Have a great weekend!

And elsewhere on Twitter…
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#F1000talks: Social media and biomedical science

F1000 Specialist Kirsten KyungWha Lee will be hosting the #F1000talks tweet chat on @F1000 next week. Kirsten is a neuroscientist at the City University of New York, currently investigating glutamate transporter-mediated synaptic clearance. She is a beginner cyclist and a foursquare super user. You can connect with her on Twitter (@ScienceJobNYC) and LinkedIn.

"Twitter circle" by The Pink Group - https://www.iconfinder.com/iconsets/social-media-icons-the-circle-set. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Twitter_circle.svg#/media/File:Twitter_circle.svg

“Twitter circle” by The Pink Group. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

A date for your diaries! The next #F1000talks tweet chat will be on Wednesday, April 15 at 1PM EST/6PM GMT. We’ll be discussing how social media can benefit biomedical scientists and their industry. Our guests are Michael Eisen (@mbeisen), Erin McKiernan (@emckiernan13), Bethany Brookshire (@scicurious) and Gary McDowell (@BiophysicalFrog).

The biomedical industry recognizes the importance of sharing knowledge and networking via social media. Communicating and connecting within and outside the field of biomedical science can bring forth new ideas, and increase efficiency (by fostering collaborations) and revenue (by raising awareness of a particular product or service).

Social media is available to everybody, from teens sharing cat memes (we all know cats rule the internet) to young scientists, seasoned researchers, and businessmen alike. It can be used to exchange ideas, discuss controversial topics, and perhaps even recruit the best and brightest minds.

In its most obvious role, social media delivers a wealth of new knowledge via tweets, blogs, Facebook posts, Youtube videos, Linkedin posts, etc. Beyond that, it’s a great networking tool that easily integrates researchers, clinicians, the public, and business people. Students who are savvy can leverage their social media skills to brand their research interests and career goals as they prepare to transition from school to the workplace. Recently, Thalyana Smith-Vikos transitioned from a graduate research position at Yale University to an editorial position at BioMed Central by showcasing her writing skills on Scizzle Blog. Her “Leafing through the Literature” blog posts highlighting recently published research kept her up-to-date with the literature and provided great practice for summarizing others’ research, which are key elements of an editor!

Furthermore, with ever dwindling NIH budgets and the advent of crowdfunding as a viable source of research funding, the proper use of social networks has become an important issue. “When I realized that the most successful science crowdfunding campaigns were essentially asking for seed/exploratory funding (along the lines of the well established NIH R03 mechanism), I thought a compelling-enough proposal could catch fire.” says Ethan Perlstein, who (along with his Crowd4Discovery collaborators Prof David Sulzer and Daniel Korostyshevsky) successfully raised $25,000 for a basic pharmacology project to study the cellular distribution of amphetamines, including methamphetamine. “It was a lot of work to run a social media campaign/offensive for two straight months. But we were rewarded with press coverage that stimulated almost half of our donations.”

While new apps and software tools are constantly developed for networking, the participation of the biomedical researchers may be limited by institutional regulations, ethical considerations, cultural barriers, and lack of time. However, while some scientists have yet to engage in a social media platform, most believe that social media channels “can strongly influence how the public thinks about science”, as seen in this F1000Research article examining scientists and social media.

We look forward to chatting with you on April 15 (1pm EST/6PM GMT) via @F1000 to further discuss how social media can benefit biomedical scientists. Follow the chat using the #F1000Talks hashtag! Our tweetchat will be composed of a 15-minute discussion between host and guests followed by a 10-minute Q&A between audience and guests. Please refer to our previous blog post and summary of a previous tweet chat for general information on participating.

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HIV’s hand, fresh blood and processed food: the F1000 Easter round up

The trending article recommendations on the @F1000 feed this week, as well as other interesting picks from around Twitter.

Have a lovely Easter, readers!

Easter bunny and chick

And elsewhere on Twitter…
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FM of the Year and Outstanding FM of the Year awards 2014

Riccardo Asero with his 2014 FM of the Year Award in Dermatology

Riccardo Asero with his 2014 FM of the Year Award in Dermatology

April is F1000 awards season: yesterday we announced the winners of the AFM Travel Grants, and today, we are thrilled to announce the winners of the ‘Faculty Member of the Year’ awards and ‘Outstanding Faculty Member of the Year‘ awards – these awards allow us to celebrate the hard work of our Faculty Members.

Every year, we award a ‘FM of the Year’ award to one Faculty Member from each Faculty, 32 in total, who have worked especially hard submitting F1000 article recommendations during the previous 12 months. For those who have previously won the FM of the Year award more than two years running and continue to make extraordinary submissions, we award ‘Outstanding FM of the Year’ – this year, 10 Faculty Members were given this accolade. The award winners are selected by the F1000 editorial team.

We would like to thank all of our Faculty for their hard work and support in 2014. Here’s a toast to you!

Please join me in congratulating all 42 Faculty Members who have won FM of the Year awards this year:

Outstanding Faculty Member of the Year 2014

Cardiovascular Disorders

Ecology

Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Microbiology

Neuroscience

Pharmacology & Drug Discovery

Physiology

Plant Biology

Public Health & Epidemiology

Structural Biology

Faculty Members of the Year 2014

Anesthesiology & Pain Management

Cardiovascular Disorders

Cell Biology

Chemical Biology

Critical Care & Emergency Medicine

Dermatology

Developmental Biology

Diabetes & Endocrinology

Ecology

Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Genomics & Genetics

Hematology

Immunology

Infectious Diseases

Microbiology

Nephrology

Neurological Disorders

Neuroscience

Oncology

Ophthalmology

Otolaryngology

Pharmacology & Drug Discovery

Physiology

Plant Biology

Psychiatry

Public Health & Epidemiology

Research Methodology

Respiratory Disorders

Rheumatology & Clinical Immunology

Structural Biology

Urology

Women’s Health

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AFM Travel Grant 2014 winners!

It’s F1000 award season once again, and up first are the winners of the 2014 AFM travel grants – a chance for us to show our appreciation for the invaluable contributions of our Associate Faculty Members (AFMs). We started the AFM travel grant fund in 2011 – for each recommendation added to F1000Prime in the calendar year, we add $1 to the fund. AFMs that have published more than 6 article recommendations each year are eligible for the prize, and each winner gets US$250 towards attending a scientific meeting/conference of their choice.

Many thanks to all of our Associate Faculty Members and the hard work you put into writing F1000 recommendations! See the full list of winners and find our more about the travel grant here. Without further ado, I announce the winners of the 2014 AFMs travel grants below. Congrats to you all, and happy scientific travels!

The winners of our Faculty Member of the Year awards will be announced tomorrow!

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Tourism/conservation link, evolving favoritism, and diet vs lungs

The trending article recommendations on the @F1000 feed this week, as well as other interesting picks from around Twitter.

And elsewhere on Twitter…
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Head transplants, leptin and bone diseases, and HIV breakthrough: the F1000 round up

The trending article recommendations on the @F1000 feed this week, as well as other interesting picks from around Twitter.

Have a great weekend!

And elsewhere on Twitter…
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