Featured F1000 Specialist – April 2016

Nihal Okan is a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School. As F1000 Specialist he has helped organize meet-ups, invited the F1000 Outreach team to his institute, and much more. Here he tells about his experience.

If you’d like to become an F1000 Specialist yourself, and tell your own colleagues about F1000, you can sign up here.
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Widening the piste of research incentives: the opportunities of open science

This is a cross-post from the F1000Research blog.

F1000-EU3I recently attended the EU Presidency Conference on Open Science in Amsterdam.  Refreshingly (and speedily), on the day after the conference, a draft Call for Action was issued.  The challenge is for the various working groups being convened by the EC to turn the Call into action.

Open science is often talked about as a way to change what is wrong about how science is currently published, shared and incentivised.  We talk about providing open access to articles to enable access to essentially print versions of articles that would previously have been visible behind journal pay-walls, and we talk about providing alternative’ views of how an article is used, so using alt metrics) to take us beyond a reliance on journal-level metrics and academic citations.  Addressing these two issues should be among the outcomes of open science, but its goals are much more forward looking and ambitious.
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FM of the Year and Outstanding FM of the Year awards 2015

Last month, we were delighted to announce the winners of the AFM Travel Grants for 2015. This month we are celebrating the hard work of our Faculty Members in recommending articles of merit by announcing the winners of our ‘Faculty Member of the Year’ awards and ‘Outstanding Faculty Member of the Year’ awards.
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A simple and efficient way to save references

The internet has given us access to vast resources of knowledge; we have an ever-growing number of journals, publications and blogs at our disposal. Keeping up with this endless stream of exceptional supply of information can be tough, how many times you find something interesting to read, but don’t have time to read it right then? This happens too often.

The F1000Workspace browser extension solves this problem for you. It is a powerful add-on to F1000’s collaborative authoring tool that is available for all popular browsers. It allows you to save articles and PDFs as you browse with a single click. You can add notes (highlights and comments) to web pages, and add articles directly to F1000Workspace. Members of a shared project share their annotations promoting discussion and making the process of collecting relevant references much more efficient.

Screen shot 1
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Featured F1000 Specialist – March 2016

Jerome Korzelius is a researcher at the DKFZ in Germany. As F1000 Specialist he has presented talks, helped organize meet-ups, wrote blog posts, and much more. Here he tells about his experience.

If you’d like to become an F1000 Specialist yourself, and tell your own colleagues about F1000, you can sign up here.
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Winners of the 2015 Associate Member Travel Grant!

F1000 award season is upon us again! Each year, we celebrate the work of our Associate Faculty Members (AFMs) by picking the winners of our AFM Travel Grant Awards.

These awards are our way of acknowledging the significant and valuable contribution AFMs make evaluating the literature for F1000Prime. Any AFM who has published six or more article recommendations in 2015 was eligible to be considered for a US$250 travel grant, which can be used towards attending a scientific meeting/conference of their choice. The winners were picked by the F1000Prime Editorial team from the list of eligible candidates.

We would like to thank all AFMs for their hard work and valued contributions in 2015, and would like to congratulate the following recipients of this year’s Travel Grants.
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F1000Workspace shines at the 60th Annual Biophysical Society meeting

Tiago Barros, F1000 Research and Analytics Manager, showing scientists how to find Smart Citations with F1000Workspace

Tiago Barros, F1000 Research and Analytics Manager, showing scientists how to find Smart Citations with F1000Workspace

Earlier this month, the F1000 team (Cesar Berrios-Otero, Outreach Director, Melanie Goldate, Business Development Manager, and myself) headed to Los Angeles, CA for the 60th Annual Biophysical Society meeting. The event is the world’s largest meeting in the biophysics field, with an attendance of over 7000 international scientists. We were very excited to show the latest developments in F1000Workspace, our reference management and writing software that revolutionizes how scientists collect, write and discuss scientific literature collaboratively.

We were thrilled with all the positive feedback and the “Wow!” reactions we got at our very busy booth. Our visitors loved the Smart Citation suggestions, project-tailored article recommendations, the ability to seamlessly collect, annotate and discuss literature with collaborators, among other exciting features. Oh, and of course everyone loved the F1000 bags and T-shirts!
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The risks of mixing science and religion

This is a guest post by F1000 Faculty Member Ferdinando Boero. Dr. Boero’s post is a commentary on a previously published article, Biomechanical Characteristics of Hand Coordination in Grasping Activities of Daily Living, Liu MJ, Xiong CH, Xiong L, Huang XL. PLoS ONE 2016; 11(1):e0146193.

 J.W. Draper's The Conflict of Science and Religion. Image by Fran6fran6

J.W. Draper’s The Conflict of Science and Religion. Image by Fran6fran6

This is a decent paper, but I would not have highlighted it if not for some sentences in it that are unusual in the scientific literature. The article comes from a country that, in the recent past, did not contribute much to some areas of research but that, nowadays, is prominent in the scientific community. The country is China, and the paper has been edited by a presumably Chinese editor working in a US university.

Chinese science is usually very good, so what’s wrong with this paper? There are sentences such as: “The explicit functional link indicates that the biomechanical characteristic of tendinous connective architecture between muscles and articulations is the proper design by the Creator to perform a multitude of daily tasks in a comfortable way.” And: “Hand coordination should indicate the mystery of the Creator’s invention.” And: “our study can improve the understanding of the human hand and confirm that the mechanical architecture is the proper design by the Creator for dexterous performance of numerous functions following the evolutionary remodeling of the ancestral hand for millions of years”.
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Featured F1000 Specialist – February 2016

Jorge Galindo-Villegas is a postdoc and the F1000 Specialist at the University of Murcia in Murcia, Spain. In the interview below, he tells about what aspects of being an F1000 Specialist he finds most rewarding.

If you’d like to become an F1000 Specialist yourself, and tell your own colleagues about F1000, you can sign up here.
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Making team science work for individual researchers

This is a guest post by Dr Mehwaesh Islam, Policy Officer at the Academy of Medical Sciences, London, UK.

The stereotypical picture of the lone scientist, toiling away in a secluded lab, only to emerge when they have their eureka moment, is rarely the way science is done these days. Scientific research is rapidly becoming a collective enterprise, and scientific discoveries are the product of large, often multidisciplinary teams, working together to solve complex problems. This rise in ‘team science’ is being driven by publishers, employers, and researchers, and also by funders.

A growing number of the latter are becoming aware of the advantages of team science and are adopting a Grand Challenges approach to fund research. But what impact is the growing number of authors on publications having on career development and recognition? Is working on team science particularly affecting early career researchers (ECRs)?
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