Spaghetti-western science, Sense and Sensibility, and Chemsex: weekly Twitter round up

The trending article recommendations on the @F1000 feed this week, as well as interesting picks from the science Twittersphere.

Have a lovely weekend!

And elsewhere on Twitter… Continue reading

Posted in Tweet stuff | Leave a comment

Recent Faculty awards

A number of our Faculty and International Advisory Board Members have received awards lately – congrats to all on these wonderful achievements!

Dame Kay Davies, an International Advisory Board Member since 2011, has been awarded the American Society of Human Genetics’ (ASHG) William Allan Award. The award recognizes substantial and far-reaching scientific contributions to human genetics, and Kay is honoured for her lifetime’s work with Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy, a genetic disorder marked by rapidly progressing muscle weakness. Professor Davies’ lab was the first to identify the genetic markers that allowed for the prenatal diagnosis of the disease.

Carla Shatz, Head of the Neuroscience Faculty, has won the 2015 Gruber Foundation Neuroscience Prize jointly with Michael Greenberg, for their pioneering work on the molecular mechanisms that control brain development and plasticity. The Gruber prize has a $500,000 monetary award shared between both winners.

James Allison, Section Head in Immunology, received the 2015 Science of Oncology Award at the ASCO (Anerican Society of Cancer Oncology) for pioneering research that led to a new way to treat cancer by unleashing an immune system attack. Allison’s research on T-cell response mechanisms and cancer’s evasion of attack by the immune system led to the clinical development of ipilimumab to block CTLA-4 and its approval as a melanoma treatment.

Posted in Awards/honors | Leave a comment

Welcoming aboard new Heads of Faculty

We welcome William (Bill) Catterall to F1000 as a Head of Faculty for Pharmacology & Drug Discovery. Professor Catterall joins fellow Heads of Faculty Floyd Bloom, Paul Insel and Leslie Iversen in this role.

William Catterall Catterall is a professor and chair at the University of Washington, and a Member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Nation Academy of Medicine (until recently known as the Institute of Medicine). He is also a Foreign Member of the Royal Society. Catterall is well known for his role in the discovery of the voltage-gated sodium channel and calcium channel proteins, and the elucidation of their function and regulation. His recent work has turned toward understanding diseases caused by impaired function and regulation of voltage-gated ion channels, including epilepsy and periodic paralysis. You can read more about his research here.

Earlier this year, we also welcomed Joseph Martin , Harvard Medical School, and Alastair Compston, Cambridge University, as joint Heads of the Neurological Disorders Faculty. They join Richard Frackowiak and Guy McKhann in the role of joint Heads of Faculty.

Joseph MartinJoseph Martin is Professor of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School. He previously served as Dean of Harvard Medical School before stepping down in 2007. Dr Martin’s research focused on hypothalamic regulation of pituitary hormone secretions and the application of neurochemical and molecular genetics to better understand the causes of neurological and neurodegenerative disease. His work led to a breakthrough in identifying a genetic marker near the gene for Huntington’s disease, eventually culminating in the identification of the gene for the disorder. Read more about his research.

Alastair Compston Alastair Compston is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge. He co-founded the MRC Cambridge Centre for Brain Repair, the Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, and Cambridge Neuroscience. He has won many awards for his research, both clinical and experimental, into multiple sclerosis (MS). In April this year, he won the John Dystel Prize for driving breakthroughs in therapeutic immunology and genetics for MS. Read more about his research here.

Posted in Behind the scenes, Faculty Members, Neurological disorders, Pharmacology & Drug Discovery | Leave a comment

The importance of the unknown, choices & memory, and cutting through the clamor

The trending article recommendations on the @F1000 feed this week, as well as interesting picks from the science Twittersphere.

And elsewhere on Twitter… Continue reading

Posted in Tweet stuff | Leave a comment

New video: AFM Erica Shaddock

Erica Shaddock, Univerity of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, has been an Associate Faculty Member in the Respiratory Disorders Faculty since 2008. She works with Faculty Member Charles Feldman to write article recommendations in the Respiratory Diseases Section.

Recently, Erica visited us at the F1000 offices in London. Here she tells Publisher Kathleen Wets about her work as a consultant pulmonologist, and specifically her interests with pneumocystis pneumonia and ventilation in the critical care setting.

Read Erica’s article recommendations on F1000Prime.

Posted in Critical care & emergency medicine, Faculty Members, Respiratory Disorders, Video | Leave a comment

Welcoming Mu-ming Poo to the International Advisory Board

Professor Mu-ming PooWe are delighted to welcome eminent neurobiologist Professor Mu-ming Poo to the F1000 International Advisory Board. Mu-ming Poo is Director of the Institute of Neuroscience at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai and the Director of the CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology. He is also the Paul Licht Distinguished Professor in Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Mu-ming was a founding member of the Hong Kong Academy of Science in 2014, and he was elected a Member of the National Academy of Sciences in 2009. He is known for his work on protein mobility in cell membranes, cellular mechanisms underlying axon guidance, and neurotrophin – and spike timing-dependent synaptic plasticity.

Read more about Professor Mu-ming Poo’s achievements in his F1000 biography. You can also find out more about his research on his lab page.

Posted in Behind the scenes | Tagged | Leave a comment

Scatter plots, statin dosage, and how to win a Nobel Prize

The trending article recommendations on the @F1000 feed this week, as well as interesting picks from the science Twittersphere.

And elsewhere on Twitter… Continue reading

Posted in Tweet stuff | Leave a comment

Queen’s birthday honours 2015

We are happy to be able to congratulate two F1000 Faculty Members on receiving Queen’s birthday honours.

Helen CrossProfessor Helen Cross, Faculty Member within the Neurological Disorders Faculty, receives an OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire) for her services to children with epilepsy. Professor Cross is Prince of Wales Chair of Childhood Epilepsy at UCL-Institute of Child Health, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, and Young Epilepsy, Lingfield, UK. She has been a Faculty Member within the ‘Epilepsy’ Section since 2014.

Chris RaineProfessor Christopher Raine, Otolaryngology Faculty Member, receives an MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) for services to the NHS and Ear Trust Charity. Prof. Raine is Consultant ENT Surgeon at the Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. He has been a Faculty Member within the ‘Otology/Vestibular/Audiology’ Section since the Faculty was created in 2010.

Many congrats to both for receiving such a prestigious honour!

Posted in Awards/honors, Faculty Members | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Just what I needed: CARs and other approaches to cancer immunotherapy

Associate Faculty Member and F1000 Specialist Jeffrey Hannah recently attended a meeting at the New York Academy of Sciences on emerging approaches to cancer immunotherapy. In this guest post, he tells us what he learned about the latest developments in this emerging field.

Cancer immunotherapyThe idea of utilizing the immune system to combat cancer is exciting for lots of reasons: it’s intuitive, it converges with the growing field of personalized medicine, it harnesses the bewildering power of the immune system, etc. It also helps that the data and anecdotal evidence for several cancer immunotherapy (IT) trials is pretty astounding. Cancer IT is being discussed as a curative treatment while even the most exciting drug-based cancer therapies are usually limited to extending patient survival times. Although many of the breakthroughs in cancer IT are recent, the idea has been around for some time. It appears that the field has matured enough that it is now a viable treatment option for many types of cancer. However, cancer and the immune system are highly complex and the most effective approaches in IT (such as T cell engineering) are inherently patient-specific. To further complicate matters, IT can be extremely expensive and there is no clear consensus on how to regulate or implement some of these therapies. Last month, I attended a meeting at the New York Academy of Sciences on emerging approaches to cancer immunotherapy to find out the latest in this promising field.
Continue reading

Posted in Conferences, F1000 Specialists, Faculty Members, Guest post, Immunology, Oncology | Leave a comment

Eyes = windows of alcoholism, Tomato power and the Unbearable lightness of protein

The trending article recommendations on the @F1000 feed this week, as well as interesting picks from the science Twittersphere.

And elsewhere on Twitter…
Continue reading

Posted in Tweet stuff | Leave a comment